15th National Wound Care Conference
About this Conference
The 15th National Wound Care Conference took place on Friday 25th February 2022 at America Square Conference Centre, and brought together the leading voices in tissue viability and wound care to discuss the key management, clinical and professional issues affecting those in the field.

As always, this year's conference offers valuable CPD for tissue viability nurses, podiatrists, nurse consultants, directors of nursing, district nurses and other nurses with an interest in wound care and provides insight, analysis and information to support informed decision making.
Register to watch On-Demand
  • Time for reflection: taking stock on how the pandemic has changed tissue viability
    The pandemic has transformed many aspects of service provision and education. This session takes stock on the changes, and predicts which of these are likely to become permanent.
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  • Maintaining wellbeing during extreme stress
    It is well documented that learning healthy coping habits can reduce effects of long term stress such as burnout. Together, we will explore recent scientific developments that promote dealing with distress, providing novel insight into why this is so important, specifically for nursing professionals (and those that work with them). Giving you access to highly efficient techniques that provide immediate relief, you are invited to experience a live TONIC session to empower your fullest professional and personal wellbeing, for you, your colleagues, your teams and those you care for.
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  • Choosing the right compression for the right patient at the right time - Sponsored by Urgo
    Many clinicians are facing significant challenges in the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective wound care. This presentation will focus on how clinicians can improve outcomes for patients with lower limb wounds, using quality improvement methodology and a 3D framework that focuses on person-centred diagnosis, evidence-based treatment decisions and inclusive dialogue.
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  • Data matters: NWCSP plans for standardising and streamlining data collection
    To set goals in tissue viability and monitor progress, there needs to be reliable and consistent collection throughout the UK. The NWCSP is introducing innovative and accessible approaches to data collection to achieve. This session will discuss how TVNs can take the lead in this.
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  • How National Education can Inform Local Learning Initiatives
    The National Wound Care Strategy Programme, in partnership with Health Education England, are developing a comprehensive suite of wound care educational resources for the health and care workforce. This session will showcase these resources and how they are being used across England and beyond to develop the current and future workforce.
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  • NWCSP first tranche implementation site – eyewitness account 1
    Implementing something new can be a daunting prospect, people aren’t always receptive to change and it crucial to have the buy in of all involved.

    Proving the need for a change in the way we delivered lower limb care within my Trust wasn’t difficult and everyone agreed there was room for improvement.

    Implementing the recommendations set out by the National Wound Care Strategy Programme (NWCSP) and developing evidence based pathways has been challenging but several months later we are really seeing the benefits not only to our patients in terms of healing rates but also with the introduction of a digital wound management system and ability to gather data and produce meaningful reports.
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  • NWCSP first tranche implementation site – eyewitness account 2
    There is widespread awareness of the NWCSP objectives, but, for many, questions remain about implementation. To test the waters, some centres are piloting implementation, to test how well they can deliver required outcomes in real-world conditions, with feedback on how others can learn from their experience. This is the first of two presentations giving preliminary results.
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  • Pressure ulcer surveillance: implementation of a more rigorous approach. How will this affect you?
    As part of the NWCSP, changes in pressure ulcer surveillance are being introduced for widescale implementation. This presentation describes what this will entail.
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  • District and Community Nursing pressures – implications for wound care delivery
    District and community nurses play a pivotal role in the nation’s health. From multifaceted clinical management, prescribing and end of life care to liaison and advocacy with care providers, complex funding assessments and so much more, the district and community nursing role is complex. Yet it is a role under unprecedented pressure, even beyond the challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic. Julie will provide an update following a recent survey that reveals the pressures and consider the impact that these will have on the delivery of person centred wound care.
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  • Debridement: An essential but often missing component of effective wound management
    This session will recap the evidence base for debridement, introducing the concept of wound hygiene and challenging current practice of debridement by dressing application. The role of curette debridement will be explored as an option for all practitioners, to ensure fast and effective wound bed preparation and antibiofilm strategy.
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  • Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS)
    Overview of hidradenitis suppurativa, and how to recognise the signs
    My own HS story – from misdiagnosis, surgeries, treatments and more
    Wound care in hidradenitis suppurativa and the impact of HS wounds from a patient perspective
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