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CICERONI Travel
  • Thursday, June 17, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    Within weeks of his death, miracles occurred thick and fast at Becket’s tomb in Canterbury Cathedral’s crypt, providing evidence to support his swift canonisation. The east end of the cathedral was rebuilt to accommodate a ravishing shrine for the...
  • Thursday, June 10, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    Appointed as Chancellor of England in 1155, Becket enjoyed a gilded life, and basked in the approbation of his king; no-one could have predicted he would die violently, slaughtered by four knights acting on Henry II’s orders. Relations between Bec...
  • Tuesday, June 8, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    At the beginning of the 20th century the River Tiber was dammed and banked, new suburbs such as Prati were modelled on Turin’s grid plan lay-out, and the ancient quarter round the Vatican, the Borgo, was divided by a long thoroughfare deliberatel...
  • Tuesday, June 1, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    When Pope Pius VII returned to Rome in 1814 from Napoleonic ‘captivity’, he initiated the transformation of the city’s ancient monuments, clearing away not only the colonising flora and fauna, but also the domestic buildings and churches that had...
  • Friday, May 28, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    Already famed in his own lifetime for his distinctive paintings of hell scenes, monsters and his genre-like allegories, Bosch has intrigued viewers for centuries. Yet although his subject matter sets him apart from more mainstream artists, he was...
  • Friday, May 21, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    Like Memling, Van der Goes worked for distinguished local and foreign clients, including Charles the Bold of Burgundy, the Florentine banker Tommaso Portinari, and the Scottish cleric Edward Bonkil. Dazzlingly virtuosic, and monumentally conceive...
  • Friday, May 14, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    Memling settled in Bruges in 1465, having previously – it is thought – worked in Rogier van der Weyden’s workshop in Brussels. His art melded Rogier’s fashionable style and imagery with that of Bruges’ great painter, Van Eyck, hence ensuring him ...
  • Tuesday, May 4, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    The American realist painter, Edward Hopper, understood how to communicate a sense of place and mood like no other. In his paintings the psychological tension of alienation and loneliness are placed in the context of everyday settings: offices, di...
  • Tuesday, April 27, 2021 · 11:00 AM BST
    Originally newspaper illustrators, The Ashcans drew on their journalistic origins in their immediate and visceral treatment of the rich and poor, the seedy and the joyous in the urban life of New York of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The...
  • On-Demand
    The arrival of a Scottish King on English soil proved fertile ground for a playwright who, by 1603, had written some of his most famous and admired works, including Hamlet, Henry V and Julius Caesar. James I, with his wider range of intellectual i...
  • On-Demand
    Following the religious upheaval of Henry VIII’s Reformation, and despite Elizabeth’s more tolerant approach to the religious divide, the scars of tumultuous change cut deep. English society experienced a revolution of thinking and religious pract...
  • On-Demand
    Hans Holbein spent two periods working in London, the influence of which echoed down through English art for decades. One consequence was the creation of what Roy Strong called "The Elizabethan Icon" – images designed to bolster the reputation of ...
Past
  • Thursday, May 27, 2021 · 9:30 AM BST
    Appointed as Chancellor of England in 1155, Becket enjoyed a gilded life, and basked in the approbation of his king; no-one could have predicted he would die violently, slaughtered by four knights acting on Henry II’s orders. Relations between Bec...
  • Lecture Series
    On 29 December 1170, Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was murdered in his cathedral, after years of quarrelling with King Henry II. Three years later he was declared a saint by Pope Alexander III, and in 1220 his body was translated to a g...
  • Lecture Series
    Following the defeat of Napoleon, visitors returned to Rome, recognising once again the city as an oasis of civilisation. Beginning with Pope Pius VII, who oversaw the return of stolen art and antiquities from France, nineteenth century pontiffs t...
  • Lecture Series
    When the ‘Flemish Primitives’ were rediscovered in the 19th century, Hans Memling (c. 1435-1494) was even more esteemed than the great ‘founders’ of early Netherlandish painting, Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden, and was the first artist to ...
  • Lecture Series
    Charles Freeman’s recent book The Awakening, A History of the Western Mind, AD 500-1700, (published by Head of Zeus) is the latest in a distinguished series in which he explores the traditions which are the bedrock of our shared cultural tradition...
  • Lecture Series
    On almost any visit exploring the ancient Mediterranean world, we encounter Greek and Roman temples. These buildings and their sacred sites were dynamic and divine, set apart and even sometimes secret. They were a vital part of ancient society, ...
  • Lecture Series
    Pre Civil War America celebrated its dwindling wilderness and newly discovered western frontiers through the grandiose panoramas of the Hudson River School of landscape painters. In post Civil War America – its innocence lost - artists were now ea...
  • Lecture Series
    Ireland has been particularly blessed by Mother Nature – the fertile soil, mild climate and generous rainfall has allowed Irish horticulture to put down particularly firm roots. As a noted writer once put it “Irish gardens, like Irish people, are...
  • Lecture Series
    From the accession of Henry VIII in 1508 to the death of James I in 1625, England experienced a series of dramatic events as the tide of history engulfed the state. The Reformation led to a long period of cultural isolation as the country remained...
  • Lecture Series
    Following the death of Shakespeare in 1616 and the closure of theatres during the Civil War, Shakespearean performance declined in popularity. With the Restoration of the monarchy, Charles II established two patented companies to present producti...
  • Lecture Series
    Johann Zoffany arrived in England in 1760, young, talented and more or less unknown. Royal patronage, an extended stay in Florence and time spent in India mark his amazing career. By his death in 1810 he was not only widely known, a member of the ...
  • Lecture Series
    The uproar that greeted the premiere of The Rite of Spring, in May 1913, has gone into legend. Yet paradoxically this most revolutionary of musical masterpieces is deeply rooted in tradition. Peter Hill will explore and illustrate how ancient and ...
  • Lecture Series
    Around 1420 a ‘new art’ emerged in Flanders – an artistic turning point as significant as that which occurred at the same time in Renaissance Italy. Though not a ‘renaissance’ in the sense of a classically inspired cultural rebirth as in Italy, t...
Cultural Lectures